My Personal Research Journey

Play

My chosen topic for this term is Play. Play can be divided in so many ways. I had subdivisions of Benefits of physical development, Benefits of outdoor play, and environmental benefits of play. I am not sure if I can do this, but I am making my subdivision: Play towards Healthy development.

If I look at Brown & Vaughn, play is a biological drive, just as health, sleep or nutrition. Play has profound implications for child development and the way we parent, education, social policy and even the future of our society (Brown & Vaughan, 2010). New research keeps on suggesting what a direct role play does to help shape our brains and also the effects of the lack of play. Brown & Vaughan suggests that play might be the most important work we can ever do and I could not agree more.

Play can sometimes be considered elusive regarding application and practice because it is not measurable. You do not apply or practice play. It is a natural state. Amon makes a correlation between play and being in a “deep creative state” dubbed “flow” (Amon, 2002, p. 8). Play could appear to not have value to anyone who does not understand human and child development. Play by character is free of form, has an appearance of un-orderliness and a front of no adults in control. In some cases, play does have a bad reputation. To the untrained eye, children are not learning unless an adult is showing them something of educational value and for this reason, theorists have done lots and lots of research to prove this bias wrong.

As much as we think we know about play, we can always learn more. The benefits that involve play and healthy development has a strong bond. I feel like I can read for hours about topics that show and explain the healthy benefits of play. Forming my simulation might seem easy at first, as play research has been done everywhere. However, my skill of fishing out the correct research is what will make my task even harder – the amount of play research. My subtopic can be divided into a million other subtopics too.

Play is such an important part of our children’s life. If you have any advice on a focus point you know needs to be researched or anything that interests you as well, I might be able to narrow down what I am looking for too.

….and of course…any websites that you have used before and loved using…please leave a comment =)

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References

Amon, K. (2002). The vital role of play in early childhood education. Gateways43. Retrieved from http://www.waldorfresearchinstitute.org/pdf/BAPlayAlmon.pdf

Brown, S., & Waughan, C. (2010). Play: How it shapes the brain, opens the imagination, and invigorates the soul. New York, NY: Penguin Group.

 

 

 

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2 thoughts on “My Personal Research Journey

  1. kayllashildrenscorner says:

    I like the concept of play because I feel that it is very important for children to play and learn through play. I actually just got invited to join a focus group that discusses the need for play even in Kindergarten. I like the fact that you point out play may not have value to others as they do not see the importance of play. I say this because I have parents ask me all the time why children play so much instead of doing dittos. What is your personal experience with play?

    Liked by 1 person

  2. jembodot says:

    Esthe,
    Love your topic. I also believe that play is an important part of our children’s lives and there’s so many benefits when play is encouraged . I have used the following websites before and I am sure they great information for your research topic. https://www.naeyc.org/ , https://www.zerotothree.org/ There is also an interesting article Why is Play Important? Social and Emotional Development, Physical this was found on …
    https://www.education.com/reference/article/importance-play–social-emotional/
    I hope I was able to offer you some support. Will be following your blog to see your results.
    Angela.

    Liked by 1 person

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